#28 TURNING OVER A NEW LEAF ILLUSTRATING SALADS

The following illustrations represent my specialty niche of food illustration. For me, illustrating a salad is a joy. The textures and colors intrigue me and reference has always been readily available. The challenges would be non-organic elements, such as bowls, plates, and bottles. However, with those challenges are reflections and opportunities to make the other part of the illustration stand out. I especially like the way I illustrated the dressing for Ready Pak Company’s spinach salad label.

OKAY, ITS NOT A SALAD. I THOUGHT I COULD STICK IT INTO THIS POST ANYWAY. THIS WAS AN EARLY JOB OUT OF CHICAGO FOR A CAFETERIA COMPANY.

One of my early clients out of San Francisco was The Iceberg Lettuce Commission. I illustrated two posters for them, and later on a brochure.

My illustrations of salads were clearly outlined by the art director on photocopy layouts. It was always helpful for me to receive such precise instructions to follow.

AN EXAMPLE OF STOCK USAGE FOR MY ILLUSTRATION.

The first poster involved a salad that had “chunks” of lettuce. The salad was being poured into space with a gradation behind the elements of salad that were falling. I went to work to prepare my photo reference. The lettuce chunks were held together with toothpicks. To give the illusion of the lettuce bowl pouring, I photographed the bowl from an aerial position and simply pushed the salad to the edge of the bowl. I positioned a black matt board with a crescent shape cut. The items that were supposedly “falling” rested on the black matt board.

MY CLEVER PHOTO REFERENCE - THIS WAS SHOT FROM ABOVE LOOKING DOWN. NOTHING IS ACTUALLY "FALLING!"

AN EXAMPLE OF THE SALAD POSTER PAINTING DONE AS A TEACHING EXAMPLE WHEN I WAS AN INSTRUCTOR.

I was pleased with my photo reference. I created my color, marker comp first. I was just beginning to develop my marker technique. The marker comp for this project went well. However, I learned a very important lesson on the comp that I did.

Marker paper is very translucent!

I affixed my marker elements to an airbrushed, gradated background. Unfortunately, the elements suddenly became gray and darkened. The gradation was showing through! Later on I always mounted marker paper to a second layer of paper. That way, the background could not show through.

This is visible on the comp, as you can see the parts where the salad is “falling” are considerably darker!

MARKER COMP WITH MY LESSON LEARNED - THE LOWER ELEMENTS ARE GLUED AGAINST THE GRADATION AND THE THIN PAPER ALLOWED THE COLOR TO SHOW THROUGH.

FINAL PAINTING FOR MY POSTER FOR THE ICEBERG LETTUCE COMMISSION.

THIS IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF AN EXCELLENT LAYOUT! THE ART DIRECTOR HAD A CLEAR IDEA OF WHAT SHE WANTED.

THE COLOR MARKER COMP WAS QUITE INVOLVED. THE FINAL ART DIDN'T REQUIRE TOO MANY CHANGES.

My second poster illustration was very intricate and complicated. Creating a marker comp was very important for this project, as well. I gathered up reference for the “stripes” of ingredients. This time when I photographed the lettuce in a bowl, the technique of holding lettuce chunks together with toothpicks worked even better.

EXAMPLE OF MY PHOTO REFERENCE FOR THE ICEBERG LETTUCE COMMISSION SECOND POSTER.

FINAL ILLUSTRATION FOR MY SECOND POSTER FOR THE ICEBERG LETTUCE COMMISSION.

 

PENCIL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THIS JOB.

LAYOUT FOR ANOTHER SALAD DRESSING LABEL.

FINAL ILLUSTRATION.

THIS ILLUSTRATION REQUIRED A “LOOSER” STYLE.

PRINTED EXAMPLE OF MY ILLUSTRATION. SO MUCH WAS CUT OFF AND OBLITERATED.

ART DIRECTOR'S LINE SKETCH FOR BROWNBERRY CROUTONS JOB.

THESE NOTES WERE FROM MY NEW YORK AGENT, CAROL.

MY PHOTO REFERENCE FOR THIS JOB.

MY FINAL ILLUSTRATION FOR BROWNBERRY CROUTONS.

My process of illustrating with color, marker comps continued. On a project for Borden, I had to photograph my hand – I thought it would be easy to create the fingernail, even though I didn’t have a long one. The art director made a comment, “Hand looks too heavy, can you make more slender?” OUCH!

THIS SALAD LOOKS GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT, SO I PROBABLY ATE IT WHEN I WAS DONE TAKING MY PHOTOGRAPH!

MY MARKER COMP FOR THE BORDEN SALAD DRESSING ASSIGNMENT.

MY MARKER COMP FOR BORDEN'S DRESSING WITH THE ART DIRECTOR'S COMMENTS. I HAVE A FAT HAND THERE! CLICKING ON THE IMAGE OPENS IT LARGER.

ANOTHER VERSION OF MY ILLUSTRATION PRINTED ON A LABEL. NOTICE HOW DIFFERENT THE COLORS ARE PRINTED, ESPECIALLY ON THE PAPER BAG.

Just as I had on demonstrated on the last post about nuts, eventually my technique evolved to incorporate the digital process. This was apparent with my illustrations for Ready Pac, Co.

My first illustration for them was the Spinach Salad. The illustrations for salad packaging always illustrated only the package elements, without the salad. Therefore, for the Spinach Salad I needed bacon, croutons, and dressing.

I completed the marker comp and began the final art. As I was working on the final art, a “later comment” came through. Sometimes that happens, and it can be very frustrating once the final painting has begun.

The later comment was that the dressing needed to be lighter and more translucent. The spices needed to be visibly floating in the dressing. I scrapped the first, final painting and began again.

Solving the texture for the croutons was fun for me. I used colored pencils to achieve the “roughness.”

PRIOR TO THE DIGITAL PROCESS, I ACTUALLY SUBMITTED LINE DRAWINGS!

MARKER COMP FOR READY PAC'S SPINACH SALAD LABEL.

AN ILLUSTRATION IN PROGRESS WHICH I "SCRAPPED" WHEN TOLD THE DRESSING NEEDED TO BE LIGHTER.

AN EXAMPLE OF MY PHOTO REFERENCE. THE DRESSING WAS TOO DARK.

I RE-SHOT MY REFERENCE FOR THE SALAD DRESSING. IN ORDER TO MAKE THE DRESSING MORE TRANSLUCENT, I DID ALTER THE RECIPE! (I ADDED CORN SYRUP).

FINAL ILLUSTRATION FOR READY PAC'S SPINACH SALAD LABEL. THIS WAS TAKEN FROM A COLOR PHOTOCOPY.

PRINTED LABEL FOR THE SPINACH SALAD. ALL OF THEIR ILLUSTRATIONS ARE OUTLINED IN BLACK.

Subsequent jobs for Ready Pac incorporated the digital process. I am sharing my digital layouts and final paintings where I painted over a print from my computer onto my watercolor paper.

FINAL PAINTINGS FOR THE TWO LABELS FOR READY PAK - PARISIAN AND ASIAN.

DIGITAL LAYOUTS FOR THE ASIAN LABEL. OFTEN I GO THROUGH ROUND AFTER ROUND, AND CONTINUE TO SEND EXAMPLES UNTIL THE ART DIRECTOR IS SATISFIED.

DIGITAL LAYOUTS FOR READY PAK'S PARISIAN LABEL. I HAD A LOT OF THOSE ITEMS TO EAT FOR DAYS.

I HAD A LOT OF SALAD TO EAT WHEN ILLUSTRATING THESE JOBS!

I appreciated not painting the intricate design on the chopsticks which were an element on the Asian Salad packaging. I printed that area darker.

On the Parisian label, there was an illustration on the dressing bottle. It has been interesting for me to illustrate another illustration – I’ve done that several times before. I did change the design and made apples into pears.

THIS IS A GOOD EXAMPLE OF WHAT "NOT TO DO." GIVING TOO MANY CHOICES MAKES A JOB FAR MORE COMPLICATED SOMETIMES. HOWEVER, USING THE COMPUTER SOMETIMES CAUSES ME TO GET CARRIED AWAY!

I THINK THIS IS MY FAVORITE ILLUSTRATION FOR READY PAC. LOVE THE GLASS.

MY MOST RECENT ILLUSTRATION FOR READY PAC. I ONLY HAD THREE DAYS.

© Judy Unger and www.foodartist@wordpress.com 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

About Judy

I'm an illustrator by profession. At this juncture in my life, I am pursuing my dream of writing and composing music. Every day of my life is precious!
This entry was posted in JOB EXAMPLES and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s